NEW BOOK IGNITES DISCUSSION ABOUT SATURATED FAT IN THE DIET


     A new book re-evaluating the role of saturated fat in the diet and highlighting the unintended consequences of a low-fat diet has elevated the national dialogue about what constitutes healthy eating. Veteran investigative journalist Nina Teicholz, author of “The Big Fat Surprise: Why Butter, Meat and Cheese Belong in a Healthy Diet,” concluded nutritional science has gotten it wrong regarding saturated fat and health. The book is gaining widespread national attention, most recently appearing as the cover story of the June TIME magazine.
     After years of meticulous research, Teicholz presents strong evidence that increasing obesity, diabetes and heart disease may be the result of eliminating the saturated fat contained in beef, milk and other animal-based foods. By doing so, Americans inadvertently may be consuming more calories from foods that don’t deliver much in terms of nutrients. Lean beef provides 10 essential nutrients and 150 calories in a 3 oz. serving.
     Earlier this year, a scientific review of 72 studies concluded “Current evidence does not clearly support cardiovascular guidelines that encourage high consumption of polyunsaturated fatty acids and low consumption of total saturated fats.” This study, Teicholz’ findings and other recent research on the subject reinforce the need, according to NCBA, for further research, including projects funded by the beef checkoff that help clarify the role and combination of all nutrients in a healthful diet.
     Beef checkoff staff contacted Teicholz to gain additional insight on her work. In the process, she was interviewed for a blog post featured on www.factsaboutbeef.com. Beef advocates are encouraged to distribute this special blog through social media channels.

KLA Vice President of Communications Todd Domer says a book written by a respected journalist has ignited discussion in nutritional circles about the benefits of nutrient-dense foods, like beef and milk, that contain saturated fat.